Apartments for Low Income

Questions and Answers

Your Questions About Apartments For Cheap In Los Angeles

April 19, 2013

Steven asks…

Me and two of my friends are moving to LA in Aug. How and where can we find good, affordable places to live?

I have heard that silver lake and west LA are ideal places to live. But I would Rather not spend 1000 a month to live there! What can I expect? Any Suggestions would be helpful!
Thanks!

Administrator answers:

We see this every day in this forum: Everyone wants to move here, and is looking for “cheap/affordable and safe”. However, such a place just doesn’t exist; the two terms are mutually exclusive. It’s all about supply and demand: If it’s in SoCal, then it’s not going to be cheap to begin with. If it’s a safe area, then it’s more expensive. If you need good schools, add a couple hundred bucks a month on top of it.

If you want to live here and enjoy the weather, then you have to pay for it. You put up with the smog and the traffic, enjoy the weather and pay your rent or mortgage. My advice is to start checking out craigslist, rent.com, and apartments.com if you are looking to rent. You’ll quickly see that the minimum rent for a non-war zone is about $1,200 per month for a 1BR. Really nice areas (like the West LA area) easily run $3,000 or more. Want to live near the beach? Expect to pay a premium.

“LA” is such a big place, there are so many neighborhoods/cities where you can live. Of course, even within a city or neighborhood, there are safer sections and less-safe sections.
In Los Angeles, some nice sections are West LA, Brentwood, Westwood, Marina Del Rey, Playa Del Rey, Los Feliz, Silverlake, and Eagle Rock. In the Valley(part of LA), you have Encino, Tarzana, Studio City, Toluca Lake, Granada Hills, Woodland Hills, Sherman Oaks, West Hills, and Chatsworth. Glendale and Burbank are good places, and are incorporated cities of their own.

To the east: South Pasadena, parts of Pasadena, Altadena, Arcadia, Monrovia, Glendora, San Dimas, Laverne, Azusa, Rancho Cucamonga.

Along the beach: Santa Monica, Marina Del Rey, Playa Del Rey, Redondo Beach, Manhattan Beach, Hermosa Beach, Torrance, Palos Verdes, Rancho PV.

In Orange County aka “The OC”: Seal Beach , Huntington Beach , Newport Beach , Corona Del Mar , Laguna Beach , Dana Point , Capistrano Beach , San Clemente , Brea, Yorba Linda, Orange, Tustin, Irvine, Laguna Hills, Rancho Santa Margarita, Lake Forest

To the west: Agoura, Calabasas, Thousand Oaks, Westlake Village, Simi Valley, Moorpark.

This is not an all-inclusive list, but it’s a start.

James asks…

Where can I find the Green Monster Documentary?

I see alot of little clips on Youtube but Im wondering if theres a whole video on some website?

Administrator answers:

– The Green Monster is the nickname of the thirty-seven-foot, two-inch (11.3 m) left field wall at Fenway Park, home to the Boston Red Sox baseball team. The Green Monster, which is only 304-310 feet from home plate, is a popular target for right-handed hitters.More……….. Http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Green_Monster ———– Part of the original ballpark construction of 1912, the wall is made of wood, but was covered in tin and concrete in 1934, and then hard plastic in 1976. A manual scoreboard is set into the wall. Despite the name, the Green Monster was not painted green until 1947; before that it was covered with advertisements. The Monster designation is relatively new. For most of its history it was simply called the wall.

The wall is the highest among current Major League Baseball fields, and is the second highest among all professional baseball fields (including minor leagues), falling approximately six inches short of the left field wall, the Arch Nemesis, at Sovereign Bank Stadium in York, Pennsylvania.

Ballparks occupied by professional baseball teams have often featured high fences hiding the field from external viewers, particularly behind open areas of the outfield where bleacher seating is low-lying or non-existent. The wall might also reduce the number of “cheap” home runs due to the barrier’s relatively close distance from home plate. Fenway’s wall serves both purposes. The shallow part of Yankee Stadium’s bleachers in right-center were backed by a high wall hiding the field from nearby apartment buildings. That wall was out of play. Past ballparks of Fenway’s era or even later which featured high fences in-play included Baker Bowl, Washington Park, League Park, Griffith Stadium, Shibe Park, and more recently, Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum. Fenway is the last of the exceptionally high-walled major league ballparks. Relatively high walls in modern ballparks have been constructed for their novelty rather than by necessity, as Fenway’s wall had been.

The Green Monster is famous for preventing home runs on many line drives that would clear the walls of other ballparks. A side effect of this is to increase the prevalence of doubles, since this is the most common result when the ball is hit off the wall (often referred to as a “wallball double”). Some left fielders, predominantly those with vast Fenway experience, have become adept at fielding caroms off the wall to throw runners out at second base or hold the batter to a single. Compared with other current major league parks, the wall’s placement creates a comparatively shallow left field; the wall falls approximately 304 – 310 feet (94 m) from the plate along the left-field foul line. Consequently, although the wall turns some line-drive homers into doubles, it also allows some high yet shallow fly balls to clear the field of play for a home run.

The distance from home plate to the Monster has long been disputed. For many years, it was posted as 315 feet (96 m). During the Red Sox pennant race in 1975, an overhead photograph of Fenway Park was shown to a man who had analyzed reconnaissance photos in preparation for bombing missions in World War II. He determined that the foul pole was just 304 feet (93 m) from home plate, but the marker on the wall was not changed. Writers from the Boston Globe once sneaked onto the field and measured it as 304.7 ft (93.2 m). In 1990, Red Sox management relabeled the distance at 310 feet (94 m), though many people still believe it to be closer than that. During 2001 and 2002, the Green Monster’s height record was temporarily beaten by the center field wall at Cinergy Field in Cincinnati, Ohio. During the construction of Great American Ball Park, located right next to Cinergy Field, a large section of seats was removed from the center field area to make room and a 40-foot (12 m) black wall was erected as a temporary batter’s eye. The entire wall was in play, too. This new wall was often called “The Black Monster.” When Cinergy Field was demolished in 2002, the Green Monster reclaimed the record.
In honor of the famed wall, the Red Sox mascot is a furry green monster, named Wally.

Http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Green_Monster#Overview —————– Images of Green Monster http://images.google.ca/images?hl=fr&source=hp&lr=lang_en&q=Green+Monster&um=1&ie=UTF-8&ei=OknGSpeiIIbO8QaMuI07&sa=X&oi=image_result_group&ct=title&resnum=4

Nancy asks…

How to change B visa to Student F1 Visa?

Hi Guys.
I am in the US on a B visa, I have extended from December to May and would like to stay in the US. I would like to work LEGALLY and be able to get a US Driver’s license, to buy a car, have it registered under my name and to rent an apartment.
I know that marrying a US citizen would be the best option for me but who would I marry? lol.
I was thinking of registering as a student in stead. But I don’t know what the procedure is.
May someone please tell me where to begin? I would like to study drama (acting) in Los Angeles. Also if you know of a cheap college I can go to, that would help.
Do you know how much I need to have in the bank if I am going to finance the course myself. I would much rather have financial assistance so if someone knows of Institutions that offer financial assistance, scholarships, bursaries etc for international students, that would be nice.
I am desperate, I don’t want to be an illegal and have to spend the rest of my life under the table. Please help!

Administrator answers:

You need to apply for student visa from within your country of citizenship. Students are strictly prohibited from working. For “on-campus employment,” the school which accepts you must offer you financial aid package which includes “work-study program,” and your maximum earnings allowed are noted on your I-20 form. You cannot exceed that. For the few who manage to get this, maximum is about $5000/year, or roughly enough to pay your personal incidental expenses, toiletries, laundry, maybe a pizza with classmates once in a while, or it might cover utilities for an apartment. $100/week does not go very far! Only 6-7% of foreign students in US receive any financial aid from their schools. If you were totally brilliant student and very lucky, you might get around $10,000, which is about 20% of costs.

You’re too late to apply for Fall 2013 admissions now. Average cost of a 4-year bachelors degree in US for Americans is $250,000, and foreign students have expenses Americans do not. If you are serious about a career in drama, that means Yale Drama, UCLA, USC – plan on at least $400,000. These are costly schools in high-cost areas. You will need to research schools, prepare to take your admissions tests, get your letters of recommendation & transcripts together, etc. You might have enough time, if you hurry up & get your ducks in a row, to get everything ready to submit your applications in Fall 2013 for admission to Fall 2014 programs.

Don’t overstay your visa! If you do, you will not get any student visa – or anything but a boot in your butt. You are already on visa extension, so you are already “risky business.” Watch yourself, and do things strictly by the book or no future for you in US or elsewhere. Countries share info on visa/immigration violations.

Sandy asks…

How much does it cost to rent an apartment in LOS ANGELES LA per month?

Administrator answers:

It obviously depends on where you live, but in general: $900-$1000 for a studio, $1200-$1700 for a one-bedroom, $1600+ for a two bedroom. It’s more expensive along the beach and in cities like Santa Monica and Beverly Hills, and it gets cheaper as you go inland and in the Valley. Sometimes you can find deals, but, you have to be willing to spend lots of time looking (months) and have money available ASAP for a security deposit. The good deals go FAST.

Paul asks…

What’s a good residential area in or around Los Angeles?

Does anyone have any suggestions on a nice, safe, family-oriented residential area or suburb in or around LA? I’ve only visited Covina and parts of Hollywood.. Thank you.

Administrator answers:

If you want to live here and enjoy the weather, then you have to pay for it. You put up with the smog and the traffic, enjoy the weather and pay your rent or mortgage. My advice is to start checking out craigslist, rent.com, and apartments.com if you are looking to rent. You’ll quickly see that the minimum rent for a non-ghetto place is about $1,000/$1,200 per month for a studio/1BR. Really nice areas (like the West LA area) easily run $3,000 or more. Want to live near the beach? Expect to pay a premium.

The answer to this really lies in the answer to the question, “Where do you work”? It’s not good at all to live in South Bay if you have a job in Pasadena. It’s stupid, in fact. The one thing that grinds people down more than anything here is the traffic. It’s the worst thing about living here. So rather than worrying about “cheap and safe”, your FIRST order of business should be getting a place close to your job. THEN you can worry about safety and price. But, to reiterate, nothing is cheap here.

“LA” is such a big place, there are so many neighborhoods/cities where you can live. Of course, even within a city or neighborhood, there are safer sections and less-safe sections.
In Los Angeles, some nice sections are West LA, Brentwood, Westwood, Marina Del Rey, Playa Del Rey, Los Feliz, Silverlake, and Eagle Rock. Palms and Mar Vista are pretty good, too. In the Valley(part of LA), you have Encino, Tarzana, Studio City, Toluca Lake, Granada Hills, Woodland Hills, Sherman Oaks, West Hills, and Chatsworth. Glendale and Burbank are good places, and are incorporated cities of their own.

To the east: South Pasadena, parts of Pasadena, Altadena, Arcadia, Monrovia, Glendora, San Dimas, Laverne, Azusa, Rancho Cucamonga.

Along the beach: Santa Monica, Marina Del Rey, Playa Del Rey, Redondo Beach, Manhattan Beach, Hermosa Beach, Torrance, Palos Verdes, Rancho PV.

In Orange County aka “The OC”: Seal Beach , Huntington Beach , Newport Beach , Corona Del Mar , Laguna Beach , Dana Point , Capistrano Beach , San Clemente , Brea, Yorba Linda, Orange, Tustin, Irvine, Laguna Hills, Rancho Santa Margarita, Lake Forest

To the west: Agoura, Calabasas, Thousand Oaks, Westlake Village, Simi Valley, Moorpark.

This is not an all-inclusive list, but it’s a start. If you want to see the safety and price factors, go to www.lalife.com. Also, the LA Times did a nice job of outlining all 277 neighborhoods in LA County: http://projects.latimes.com/mapping-la/n… Time to get researching!

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