Apartments for Low Income

Questions and Answers

Your Questions About Apartments In Austin Tx

July 4, 2013

Robert asks…

Does anyone know of any cheap apartments in Round Rock TX?

Im planning on moving there, but im having trouble finding apartments in a reasonable price range. If anyone could give me the names of some affordable appartments in the Round Rock area, I would greatly appriciate it. Thanks =D

Administrator answers:

Having lived in the Austin area for 25 years I can tell you one thing: Nothing is cheap here. From what I have heard the prices go from $800 and up for a decent place. I rented a 3 bedroom house for 3 years when we first moved here in 1982 and the payment was $ 1000.00 plus utilities.
Why Round Rock, look in all areas around Austin. When we first came here we lived in a motel for a week so we could look around and read the local paper which is the Austin American Statesman, look it up on the web

Sharon asks…

I’m a 24 year old moving to Austin, TX. What neighborhood should I live in?

I’d like to live near people in their mid/late 20′s as opposed to a College crowd, but still be near the main strip with Bars and Restaurants. Any suggestions?

Administrator answers:

Its tough to answer since there isn’t a lot of info (where are you working, how much can you afford), but let me try.

Downtown is definitely the ‘main strip’ but it can be outside the price range of most 24 year olds (heck, most people period).

South of downtown is generally cheaper and still close to downtown. In fact, the area of South Congress has its own strip with bars and restaurants.

North of downtown puts you into the campus and college crowd, so that won’t be what you are looking for.

This page has a map of apartments all over Austin, so you can shop for your location and budget.

Http://everythingaustinapartments.com

Good luck. I love it here.

Maria asks…

How can you get out of your apartment lease?

My lease is through July but I want to move this month. My contract looks as if I’d have a reletting fee of several hundred dollars, plus I would pay about 150% of my rent each month through July. Any good ways to get out of this or significantly reduce it?
Edit: This is in Texas. Plus, I had a co-signer. Will this complicate things?

Administrator answers:

It depends on what state you live in, I am a landlord in California, (all tenants must sign a hazardous paint/lead warning addendum, however if your landlord is a rookie and failed to notify you of this that may work). My best advice is to be extra sweet and talk to the management about your desire to move. The reason I say “extra sweet” is because, hey we are all human!, and they will much more likely try to help you if approached with a smile, rather than a demand. I have some other suggestions, but they are contigent upon where you live….

Unfortunately Texas law is extremely anal about breaking a lease.
A new court ruling however, may be on your side:

G. What happens if I want to break my lease?
IF for some reason you decide to move out before your lease is up, your landlord basically has three options: (1) accept your surrender of the apartment and not hold you liable for any further rent; (2) be your “agent” and try to get a replacement tenant, and subsequently recover damages incurred as a result of having to find another tenant; or (3) do nothing and sue for rent.
Historically, courts have been split as to whether a landlord has a duty to mitigate damages, i.e. Use reasonable efforts to find a replacement tenant, if he or she chooses to exercise option (3). A recent case decided by the Texas Supreme Court, however, seems to have settled the question. The court held that a landlord must attempt to relet your apartment before he or she may sue you for breaching your lease.
Website: http://www.law.uh.edu/peopleslawyer/tenant3.html

Here is an excerpt I found in Texas’ Property Code for Rental Tenancies:
§ 92.1031. CONDITIONS FOR RETENTION OF SECURITY DEPOSIT
OR RENT PREPAYMENT. (a) Except as provided in Subsection (b), a
landlord who receives a security deposit or rent prepayment for a
dwelling from a tenant who fails to occupy the dwelling according to
a lease between the landlord and the tenant may not retain the
security deposit or rent prepayment if:
(1) the tenant secures a replacement tenant
satisfactory to the landlord and the replacement tenant occupies
the dwelling on or before the commencement date of the lease; or
(2) the landlord secures a replacement tenant
satisfactory to the landlord and the replacement tenant occupies
the dwelling on or before the commencement date of the lease.
(b) If the landlord secures the replacement tenant, the
landlord may retain and deduct from the security deposit or rent
prepayment either:
(1) a sum agreed to in the lease as a lease
cancellation fee; or
(2) actual expenses incurred by the landlord in
securing the replacement, including a reasonable amount for the
time of the landlord in securing the replacement tenant.

Added by Acts 1995, 74th Leg., ch. 869, § 13, eff. Jan. 1, 1996.
That website can be found here:

http://www.capitol.state.tx.us/statutes/docs/PR/content/htm/pr.008.00.000092.00.htm

I would again emphasize speaking with your property manager. If you are nice, polite, and explain why you need to move (also state that you will be more than willing to find a replacement, subject to their approval of course). They will most likely try to work with you. Do this IN PERSON, it is hard to turn someone down while they are standing in front of you. Tell them you realixe that you are putting them in a difficult situation, but that you had no intentions of breaking the lease, EVER. If this should fail, contact the Austins Tenant Council, their website: http://www.housing-rights.org/

Let me know if I can be of any assistance, and good luck!

William asks…

My bf and I are graduating from college May ’07, we are considering buying a townhouse?

We plan to stay in our current town, which is a fast growing college town in Illinois, for at least 1-2 years. We are sick of renting and apartment life, and are considering buying a townhome or small house. My question is, would it be worth it to buy a house and only live there for 2 years max? Or should we just keep renting? We want to eventually move to Austin, TX, but we’re scared our house wouldn’t sell when we decide to move. As I said, the town is a fast growing college town. Businesses thrive here, and the largest insurance company is headquartered here. Advice???

Administrator answers:

If you can find a Foreclosure of Tax Lien property selling below

market value, then I would buy. If not the I would continue to

rent for the 2 years. Here is a resource that you can use to do

an unlimited Free search for 7 days to get an idea of what is

available now. Http://www.realmoneyideas.com Go to their

Real Estate page, and look near the top of the page. On the

same site are other ideas on what to look for when searching

for a home.

Ruth asks…

What’s the minimum annual salary a single person needs to make to get a decent apartment in fort worth, tx?

Decent, I mean not a section a apt or people hanging around apts, or all pills paid kind of apt but, also not like over 700.00 if any?

Administrator answers:

I am in Austin but hey I figure close enough. The salary necessary is going to depend on that persona finances. There are many variables like-auto payment, credit cards, student loans etc… If one has NONE they can make less than another that has a $500 car payment, $250 in student loans, and $400 a month in CCards.

I would state if you are single and make 35,000K you can afford a decent apartment in the area…again that is depending on what OTHER bills you have

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