Apartments for Low Income

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Your Questions About Cheapest Apartments In America

July 10, 2013

Helen asks…

What’s a good way to go about moving to anchorage Alaska?

Me and my cousin want to move to anchorage Alaska in about two year when we finish school at that time ill be 21 and he’ll be 19 and we are looking for a good way to go about moving to anchorage from the Bremerton WA. area and we figure we’ll need at least 10-15k to live on for the first 6months to a year while we find jobs, and we want to know if there’s a right way and a wrong way todo it.
We already know that the cost of living is higher there but that’s why we picked anchorage the prices on average are closer to where we live now. And that’s why we need some advise/tips on the best way to go about it

Administrator answers:

Based on your question and some basic math, I am guessing that you have never moved to a different town in general.

Moving to Anchorage is not going to be much different that moving to Orlando, FL or even a place in your hometown.

First, you are going to need to get there. I’d recommend driving up there, preferably with a U-Haul trailer or something that can haul your belongings. Personally, I’d opt trying to arrive during the warmer months. The Alaska Highway is much more forgiving when it is not winter. Winter brings sudden storms, cold temperatures, and not much daylight. Roads in Anchorage itself are not terrible in winter. They are a bit icier and snow covered than I am used to seeing in the Midwest, but you can drive on them with any type of car for the most part. You can hop the ferry out of Bellingham as well. You’d have to figure out which route will be cheaper.

Second, you need a place to stay. If you have the money, try to fly up there a month or so before and look at some apartments or try to rent a house/condo/trailer. Try and go a bit on the cheaper side for rent in case you can’t find work.

Third, try and develop some marketable skills before going up there. You have a few years and it sounds like you are out of high school or nearing the end. Enroll in the local Community College and see if you can take up welding. Marine Mechanics are always in demand in Alaska, especially if you have half a clue what you are doing. Getting a CDL might be a cheap, and worthwhile investment as there are mines throughout Alaska and supplies to move to the oil fields. Try and go up there with something you can use to get work, even if it is not ideal.

Fourth, get money. You are going to need money to survive until the paychecks start rolling in. Rent, security deposit, gas money, groceries, etc… This can be the scary part. I moved to the Chicagoland area with $1K and a job. $800 of that went to my part of rent and security deposit. $200 had to last 30 days for gas and food until my first paycheck. That was rough. But beyond having money to start your life there, I would set some money aside to get back home. You might not find work in Anchorage or just decide it isn’t for you. Keep some money aside for a plane ticket home.

Remember the State of Alaska has job centers. I haven’t used one in almost 20 years, but basically you walk in, have an interview with a counselor, and they match you with current job openings. They have an office in Anchorage. Go there and get a paycheck coming in:

http://www.jobs.state.ak.us/offices/index.html

I’ve lived in Alaska, but not Anchorage. I’ve visited and Anchorage seemed like any other small city in America.

Good Luck!

Lisa asks…

Advice for being a single Mom with no support system?

My ex is a deadbeat, my family lives two states away, my friends have no children and are unwilling to help. My son is 5 and really a handful and I can barely afford daycare, food, car and my house. I make slightly more than the state income level for any type of public assistance. I just don’t know how to do it anymore.

Administrator answers:

Take your deadbeat to court for child support? That could help a decently. Make friends with people who do have children? Try coworkers? Neighbors? Church groups? There’s got to be something in your area. If you’re renting maybe downsize from house to apartment. Everyone has extra stuff they are spending and don’t have to. Look at what you’re really spending your money on. Shop clearance, sales, clip coupons, compare pricing, try store brand stuff and shop somewhere cheaper. If you have a habit like caffeine, nicotine, or anything work on quitting. Recycle! You can get money back from that! You’d be amazed if you tighten the belt here and there. The coupon might only be 75 cents… The whole trunk load of cans might be $20… But it does add up over time. It is worth the effort. Another thing… Fees… I assume you have a bank account.. Check to see all the fees they like to tack on… If it’s getting to be not worth it find another bank. I know Bank of America was the worst with that when I was growing up (not sure about now) so I went with a local bank that only had a fee if I withdrew from the account at another bank on top of that other bank would charge, but it was significantly less than all the fees B of A had and I’d rarely do that as I didn’t travel much. Cellphones are another drain. Get a pre-paid or if you’re with a plan and find out you’re not using all your minutes you can change the plan to pay for less minutes. There are a million ways to save money.

Another option is moving. If you work at a place that has a place in another city, state, or whatever you can transfer. You can seek a better job. There is no rule about job hunting while in a job. If you’re in a type of job you like or found your career path… Skills are transferable. Just do research first to see where it’s more bombing. Just throwing that out there if you wanted to get closer to family or if you really think you’re in a rut at your present location.

It’s tough out there, but you can do it. You’re all the support system you really need. The rest is luxury.

Robert asks…

How do I move back to Denmark?

I’m from Denmark. My parents moved with me when I was 3 years old to America. I absolutely hate it here. I know a lot about my home country of Denmark, and want to move back when I’m 18. Since that is only in a few years, I’m starting to get prepared, money-wise. I have a friend that will allow me to live with him for 2 months after I arrive.
However, I don’t think that is enough time to get me settled in. I need help. I won’t have that much money, maybe enough for an apartment for a while but that’s it.
Here:

I still have my citizenship for Denmark.
Can you recommend me some jobs that I could apply for in Denmark? Here’s what I am good at.
I do parkour (favorite thing in the world), I’m an advanced swimmer, I love to scuba dive, I’m kind of good at computer programming, I’m really good at teaching people how to do things, I know Judo and Taekwondo, and am a good fighter. I love shooting guns and hunting. I loved Airsoft as a kid, so I have an exceptional aim. I can speak Danish, English, French, German, and Norwegian.

Please list a job you think I’d be good at somewhere in Denmark.
Please list a condo or apartment that is ‘quite’ cheap I could stay at in Denmark.
And anything you can that would help me! (Yes I can speak fluent Danish)

Administrator answers:

I’m a dane too, and i would recommend you to teach other people about some of the things you can do, like parkour. (Please come to silkeborg and teach parkour, I would really like to learn that.) you could also tey and get into the military. With your skills, i definitely think you could make a career out of that. Www.ug.dk is a danish website with lots of information about different jobs, and www.forsvaret.dk is the military’s website

Maria asks…

how difficult is it to own a home in the UK?

i understand that the UK has a HUUGE population yet not much land area, i would think this would pose some issues when it comes to housing. even where i live ,where there is plenty of space housing is more expensive then i can afford but there are still many places in America where one could buy a home with a relatively low mortgage.
what does it cost to own a home in the UK, do most people rent? do most people live in apartments(flats i think you call them) how does it work out with so many people in such a small space!!?

Administrator answers:

Put it this way, I just left the UK (my own Country) and emigrated to the US.
One of the reasons was that I would NEVER be able to afford my own home there, especially not in London where I was born and raised.

My family’s place in east London is valued at around the half-million pounds mark (so that’s approximately a million US dollars), and it’s only a three bedroom Victorian terraced.
The prices are going up and up constantly, while salaries in some fields (mainly the various construction trades) are going down due to huge numbers of cheap migrant workers from eastern europe flooding the work market. All that equals no chance of buying a property.

Daniel asks…

How do I get back to Denmark?

I’m from Denmark. My parents moved with me when I was 3 years old to America. I absolutely hate it here. I know a lot about my home country of Denmark, and want to move back when I’m 18. Since that is only in a few years, I’m starting to get prepared, moneywise. I have a friend that will allow me to live with him for 2 months after I arrive.
However, I don’t think that is enough time to get me settled in. I need help. I won’t have that much money, maybe enough for an apartment for a while but that’s it.
Here:

I still have my citizenship for Denmark.
Can you recommend me some jobs that I could apply for in Denmark? Here’s what I am good at.
I do parkour (favorite thing in the world), I’m an advanced swimmer, I love to scuba dive, I’m kind of good at computer programming, I’m really good at teaching people how to do things, I know Judo and Taekwondo, and am a good fighter. I love shooting guns and hunting. I loved airsoft as a kid, so I have an exceptional aim. I can speak Danish, English, French, German, and Norwegian.

Please list a job you think I’d be good at somewhere in Denmark.
Please list a condo or apartment that is ‘quite’ cheap I could stay at in Denmark.
And anything you can that would help me! (Yes I can speak fluent Danish)

Administrator answers:

It is a good thing, that you still have Danish citizenship, and that you speak Danish – but it will not get you a job.

You will still need an education, to get a job – without an education, you might only get a job as e.g.
A dish washer (if the other applicants do not have better qualifications than you).

Even with an education, you will not have any guarantees to get a job – the employment rate in Denmark is high at the moment.

Before moving to Denmark, it might be a good idea to find out what you really want, and what you expect – Denmark is not the best place to be, if you have no income, and no friends/family nearby.

Find out why you hate it in The US – is it the country, or is it a problem with the people around you, or something else – my guess is, that right now you are an angry teenager, who just think that the grass is greener on the other side – believe me, it is not.

No country is perfect, and no person is perfect.

Wait a few years before you decide to make such a drastic change in your life – think it through THOROUGHLY.

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