Apartments for Low Income

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Your Questions About Cheapest Apartments In Manhattan

June 23, 2013

Mandy asks…

where should i live in souther california?

i’m 18 im moving to california, i want to be close to LA but not live there i want to live in a nice area because is just gonna be me. suggestions?

Administrator answers:

We see this every day in this forum: Everyone is looking for the “cheap, clean, and safe”. It’s all about supply and demand: If it’s in SoCal, then it’s not going to be cheap to begin with. If it’s clean and safe, then it’s more expensive. If you need good schools, add a couple hundred bucks a month on top of it.

If you want to live here and enjoy the weather, then you have to pay for it. You put up with the smog and the traffic, enjoy the weather and pay your rent or mortgage. My advice is to start checking out craigslist, rent.com, and apartments.com if you are looking to rent. You’ll quickly see that the minimum rent for a non-war zone is about $1,000-$1,200 per month for a studio or 1BR. Really nice areas (like the West LA area) easily run $3,000 or more. Want to live near the beach? Expect to pay a premium.

“LA” is such a big place, there are so many neighborhoods/cities where you can live. Of course, even within a city or neighborhood, there are safer sections and less-safe sections.
In Los Angeles, some nice sections are West LA, Brentwood, Westwood, Marina Del Rey, Playa Del Rey, Los Feliz, Silverlake, Eagle Rock, Encino, Tarzana, Studio City, Toluca Lake, Granada Hills, Woodland Hills, Sherman Oaks, West Hills, Chatsworth.

To the east: South Pasadena, parts of Pasadena, Altadena, Arcadia, Monrovia, Glendora, San Dimas, Laverne, Azusa, Rancho Cucamonga.

Along the beach: Santa Monica, Marina Del Rey, Playa Del Rey, Redondo Beach, Manhattan Beach, Hermosa Beach, Torrance, Palos Verdes, Rancho PV.

In Orange County aka “The OC”: Seal Beach , Huntington Beach , Newport Beach , Corona Del Mar , Laguna Beach , Dana Point , Capistrano Beach , San Clemente , Brea, Yorba Linda, Orange, Tustin, Irvine, Laguna Hills, Rancho Santa Margarita, Lake Forest

To the west: Agoura, Calabasas, Thousand Oaks, Westlake Village, Simi Valley, Moorpark.

This is not an all-inclusive list, but it’s a start.

Lisa asks…

how much does a one bedroom apartment in new york cost?

im not sure which city i want either Manhattan, buffalo, or really anywhere besides Staten island or jersey . So on average or give an estimate on what it cost for a one bedroom because i will be moving there by myself and i dont know anyone there so wont have a roomate

Administrator answers:

In Manhattan, $2000 a month. Also, Manhattan landlords tend to want proof of 30 to 40 times monthly rent in annual income for two or more years, or a guarantor in the area who makes 100 times rent. There are certainly exceptions but that’s what you’re most likely to find, and don’t forget that you’ll take home almost nothing when your taxes are withheld.

You should be able to find a place in the far reaches of NYC for less than $1000. Housing in other cities will be substantially cheaper. But, state taxes are still usurious and all you get in return is nightmarish wastelands like Poughkeepsie, Kingston and Albany.

Small towns upstate are wonderful once you get used to them. But, you may experience culture shock. If you want to be in a city in New York, move to Brooklyn or Queens with little more than the clothes on your back, shack up with friends or strangers and pay $500-$1000 in rent, waitress 16 hours a day and try to make a life.

Linda asks…

what are some affordable and safe neighborhoods around LA?

Just wondering what might be a safe,but practical place around LA to live?
I know its not cheap to live IN LA so im wondering about surrounding neighborhoods?

anyone who lives in or around would help me out alot
thanks
okay,Im talking about can you find a nice studio for around 1500?
Somwhere where im not going to die also would be nice

Administrator answers:

It’s just not like that here. What you’re asking for doesn’t exist around LA.

I finally figured that out after visiting enough cities. In other cities, you can be 10 miles out of downtown, find a nice little place with a yard for a reasonable price, and live comfortably with a commute you can handle. However, LA is not like that at all. It defines the term “urban sprawl”. There is nothing here “reasonably priced”, according to your definition, which would be reasonable in your town.

If you start in downtown LA, you have to go more than 100 miles in any direction to find anything resembling what you’re looking for. It’s strip malls, suburban tracts, and commercial development for at least 100 miles. And when you get past that 100 miles, you’re either in the desert, Mexico, the San Joaquin Valley, or Central California.

We see this every day in this forum: Everyone wants to move here, and is looking for “cheap/affordable and safe”. However, such a place just doesn’t exist; the two terms are mutually exclusive. It’s all about supply and demand: If it’s in SoCal, then it’s not going to be cheap to begin with. If it’s a safe area, then it’s more expensive.

If you want to live here and enjoy the weather, then you have to pay for it. You put up with the smog and the traffic, enjoy the weather and pay your rent or mortgage. My advice is to start checking out craigslist, rent.com, and apartments.com if you are looking to rent. You’ll quickly see that the minimum rent for a non-war zone is about $1,000-$1,200 per month for a studio or 1BR. Really nice areas (like the West LA area) easily run $3,000 or more. Want to live near the beach? Expect to pay a premium.

“LA” is such a big place, there are so many neighborhoods/cities where you can live. Of course, even within a city or neighborhood, there are safer sections and less-safe sections.
In Los Angeles, some nice sections are West LA, Brentwood, Westwood, Marina Del Rey, Playa Del Rey, Los Feliz, Silverlake, and Eagle Rock. Palms and Mar Vista are pretty good, too. In the Valley(part of LA), you have Encino, Tarzana, Studio City, Toluca Lake, Granada Hills, Woodland Hills, Sherman Oaks, West Hills, and Chatsworth. Glendale and Burbank are good places, and are incorporated cities of their own.

To the east: South Pasadena, parts of Pasadena, Altadena, Arcadia, Monrovia, Glendora, San Dimas, Laverne, Azusa, Rancho Cucamonga.

Along the beach: Santa Monica, Marina Del Rey, Playa Del Rey, Redondo Beach, Manhattan Beach, Hermosa Beach, Torrance, Palos Verdes, Rancho PV.

In Orange County aka “The OC”: Seal Beach , Huntington Beach , Newport Beach , Corona Del Mar , Laguna Beach , Dana Point , Capistrano Beach , San Clemente , Brea, Yorba Linda, Orange, Tustin, Irvine, Laguna Hills, Rancho Santa Margarita, Lake Forest

To the west: Agoura, Calabasas, Thousand Oaks, Westlake Village, Simi Valley, Moorpark.

This is not an all-inclusive list, but it’s a start.

Jenny asks…

Do you recommend living in Cincinnati?

How do you rate Cincinnati in terms of living and how you like it? What are the pros and cons of living in Cincinnati?
I basically want to move pretty soon, I have a little apartment in Manhattan that I’m paying too much for and I’m pregnant with twins. I need to be in a large city but where I can have more room for less money and be in a safe area. I was thinking about Chicago too, what do you think?

Administrator answers:

Chicago is cheaper than NY but is still pricey. It’s cleaner, nicer, less crazy and a bit cheaper. Cincinnati is a total different world. Cincy is quit, kind of boring, more conservative, not a lot of attractions or things to do. In the other hand it is way, way, way cheaper, I guess if you want to raise a family in a less crowded, and more economical city, Cincy is the one.

I came to Cincinnati from Chicago about 4 years ago. I miss my family whom I left in Chicago so bad. We are moving back to Chicago when we finish our careers in about in year. Even though is more expensive, Chicago is way nicer and much, much more fun than Cincy.

You should come to both places for a week or so and see how the life style is like in both. NY is a great city, I have tons of family there (Manhatan & Bronx) and it’s super fun, we go there once in a while and we have a blast. But that’s it. I would not move to NY, the living is expensive, the drivers are crazy, and the city is over crowded.

George asks…

what is holden caulfield’s coming of age moments in Catcher in the Rye?

I need to write a two page essay so i need to know how his coming of age moments relate to life for teenagers today, are his moments believable ?

THANK YOU!!!!

Administrator answers:

Coming of age is timeless. It is when you realize you can see the world around you and start to think about the person you are now and the person you might be in the future. It starts when Holden has finally left Pencey Prep. He’s flunked out, and he knows that he could have been a better student–but he was so disenchanted with the school, his surroundings, and the people he knew, that he didn’t care and gave up. By that time he had started to know his own mind. In the days he was wandering around New York waiting to come home to his family the whole time was a coming-of-age experience for him. Here are some of the most crucial moments:

–He checks into a cheap Manhattan hotel and decides to get his virginity over and done with (he is slightly ashamed of himself that many boys his age have already lost theirs). He arranges to meet a prostitute but can’t go through with the act because he feels no affection for her. The girl is young and he simply feels sorry for her situation. He doesn’t feel “sexy” and pays her anyway.

–He meets two Catholic nun teachers at a lunch counter. He discusses Shakespeare’s “Romeo and Juliet” with them and afterward hopes that the frank conversation hasn’t offended them in any way. For no particular reason he has a bit of an upset stomach after lunch and wonders why. –

–Out of loneliness he calls Carl Luce, an old school friend, and meets him in a bar for a drink. He never liked the conceited Luce much anyway, and leaves the bar feeling even more lonely, as if he didn’t know what friends he could count on, o r even if he could name anyone he could call a friend.

–He arranges to meet a girl, Sally Hayes, that he once dated. They walk around New York and go ice-skating, but he decides that this girl, who physically attracted him more than any other, had a “phony” and materialistic personality and held nothing for him. During all the time he spends with Sally his mind is partly on a girl named Jane Gallagher; he never dated her and was only a friend but they had some affinity; this is the person he really wanted to be with, for reasons he couldn’t even explain to himself. At some point he decides to call her on the telephone, but in the end he can’t bring himself to talk. Holden wonders why and for the first time in his young life is beginning to examine his own mind.

–He doesn’t want his parents to know he has been expelled, so he eventually sneaks into his family’s apartment and visits his sister Phoebe, whom he loves more than anyone in the world. He tries to confess his frustrations and anxieties to her, but she really is too young to understand. So he buries his feelings in his older-brother persona. During this time in the narrative he reminisces about his love for his younger brother Allie, who died of leukemia. He admits to himself that he cannot yet accept his brother’s death. –

–Eventually Holden is at the end of his rope and at the story’s conclusion gets his happiest feelings in a long time watching young childen ride a merry-go-round in the park. He realizes that he is fighting hard against the end of childhood and innocence and maybe losing. He doesn’t want to join the adult world that he feels is phony and superficial.

All of this is a coming-of-age experience because in these few days Holden has discovered many important things about himself. Sure, he’s confused and depressed, and he’s going to go into therapy, but in the course of this story he has seen some of the world around him and has realized that he has strong opinions and feelings. He’d never realized it before.

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