Apartments for Low Income

Questions and Answers

Your Questions About Cheapest Apartments In The Us

May 8, 2013

Chris asks…

What is the likelihood of being kicked out of student housing?

I want to stay in one of the newer apartments on campus when I go to university this fall. They’re generally nicer than the other ones, and their rent is slightly cheaper. But they are also not owned by the school. My parents are concerned about the risk of them kicking students out and having to continue paying rent, and while I’ve heard of things like this happening before, can’t that technically happen with any form of student housing? Also, is it that common? I don’t see why they would. These are new apartments, so it’s not like they’re going to shove us all out for maintenance/repairs, and it’s unlikely that the company is going to sell them to someone else in such a short time. I like them because they have lots of room, they’re clean, they’re on a safe part of campus (near a lot of the main buildings, so it’s safer if you need to go somewhere at night), and I might get to room with a friend. Aside from the possibility of being kicked out for no apparent reason, it seems like a really good deal, and the rent is pretty decent for what they offer. So yeah, does stuff like that happen a lot?

Administrator answers:

Make sure payments are on time. Don’t violate any rules you have nothing to worry about.

Donna asks…

How realistic would it be for my friend and I to move out together?

My friend and I really would like to move out together. We want to move sometime early next year. We don’t think we can afford it. Right now, I believe she works 40-45 hours a week at 6.50/hour. I don’t have a job right now, but I am getting on at a restaurant making 2.13/hour plus tips. We’re both going to be full-time college students. She doesn’t own a car. My insurance is paid for. She doesn’t have credit, I have okay credit. We want to move to a place in Gallatin or Hendersonville, Tennessee.

Two young ladies working at or slightly above minimum wage.
Is it possible for us to move out?
My friend and I really would like to move out together. We want to move sometime early next year. We don’t think we can afford it. Right now, I believe she works 40-45 hours a week at 6.50/hour. I don’t have a job right now, but I am getting on at a restaurant making 2.13/hour plus tips. We’re both going to be full-time college students. She doesn’t own a car. My insurance is paid for. She doesn’t have credit, I have okay credit. We want to move to a place in Gallatin or Hendersonville, Tennessee.

Two young ladies working at or slightly above minimum wage.
Is it possible for us to move out?

Note: We are going to a Community College, no campus dorms.

Administrator answers:

Not in California… LOL Rent alone is $800-$2000 a month in a cheap place like Fresno and like $3500+++ in places like Santa Cruz.

But since you are not in California…. Try this:

First, do research. Find apartments you might move into and get an idea of rent. Ask about average utilities costs or ask friends what they pay who live in apartments around you. How much is phone and gas? How much will you commute? What do you spend on clothes? What will laundry cost you?

Then after all your research, make an Excel spreadsheet listing all possible expenses such as rent, food, gas, auto payments, insurance, auto repairs, clothes, household items such as soap, cleaning supplies, makeup, etc… Include utilities, misc expenses such as eating out, dating, social life… Then total and compare to your income AFTER taxes. Try to have at least money extra for things that you don’t plan on. Don’t count on future income such as raises, overtime that might end…. Then with all the numbers in front of you, decide if moving out makes sense or not. ;-) )

Mark asks…

How do vacation condo rentals work?

Some friends and I are planning a vacation for this summer. We came across these condos for rent which would be much cheaper for 4-6 people to stay in as opposed to a hotel.

I think how it works is, someone owns the apartment and rents it out while they’re not around. I’m assuming we would have to do our own cleaning, which is fine.

My question is, can the owner turn us down for the rental if they don’t like the thought of some 20-somethings staying in their condo?

Also, if we make a reservation, could the owner change their mind and take the reservation away if they decide to use that week?

Administrator answers:

Your assumption is correct, but it also could be that the owner never stays there but is simply using the condo as a rental property to generate income. Re cleaning, you would have to do it yourself, and make sure it is as clean when you leave as it is when you arrive. Next two questions – yes, the owner can refuse to rent to whomever they want, and, there is always a possibility that they could cancel your rental prior to your arrival (I had it happen to me in Maui a few years ago, and was right ticked off since it cost way more for a late second choice).

Joseph asks…

What would it take to force colleges to lower their tuition?

I’m sick of hearing stories from my dad about how college was so cheap in the 1970′s. He was able to go to a private university without loans. It appears that everyone takes out a loan to finance college today.

Administrator answers:

Inflation is part of the issue, but certainly in the US there are also greatly changed expectations from the students. In general, they want more, and you can’t have “more” without paying for it.

Where do I see more expense?
** Students bringing cars to campus (more parking, more maintenance, more staff).
** Dorm food is like restaurant, not cafeteria
** Dorm rooms are upgraded because students want suites and apartment style living rather than be satisfied with a boxy room
** Technology. Wiring, constant upgrades, constant demand for faster and better services for both work and play
** Equipment and labs are increasingly sophisticated in sciences, arts, etc.
** Expectations for facilities in athletics, performance spaces, galleries are at a higher level, including such things as acoustics, lighting, specialized surfaces, etc.
** It isn’t enough to have a gym and a track. Students want a workout space that again has specialized equipment for their individual use — it isn’t just the athletes using this stuff these days

That’s just part of the possibilities, but every one of them is a major contributor toward increased costs. Few students would look seriously at a school that didn’t offer up-to-date amenities that are often more lifestyle choices than ones impacting their educations. Then it turns into a competition when one school tries to outdo the next with the latest and greatest — and students go for it every time.

Changing expectations would make a difference, but it is a difficult thing to do. Maybe some college could go “back to basics” and do a p.r. Campaign and make it a selling point but I don’t know how many students would be willing to make that choice.

Ruth asks…

apt was flooded not our fault. apt manger wants to clean the carpets instead of replacing it. is that right?

The flood came from a leaked pipe in the apartment next to us. The maintenance people came and cut up our carpet and used a blower to dry it out. Its been two days, the carpet is still cut up my apartment smells like mildew and all their going to do is put the old carpet back and have it cleaned. And its goind to take another two days to get all this done. I’m afraid of mold and the smell. What rights do i have in this case?

Administrator answers:

Most cities go with a standard of 3 S’s. Safe, sound, and sanitary. Your first concern will be is the method of correcting the problem safe for you. According to what you wrote the answer is no. If the owner’s insurance, or somebody’s, won’t cover the needed cleanup then he’ll have to come out of pocket.

The flooring and baseboards should be clean and dry before ANY carpet is put down. If you were to agree to it the old carper could be relain but it would first have to be treated. It would be cheaper for the owner’s budget and your peace of mind if he sprung for new carpet. You might offer to chip in and upgrade to something you can be happy with. If you don’t plan on being there much longer that option is out.

Try to peacefully persuade the owner before you go running to the city with your complaint. It’s a valid complaint but being on friendly terms with the landlord has to be worth something.

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